2014

Why the IKEA catalogue is the one thing you must own

#AnAdvertADay #Day62

10 months, 300 pages and 12,000 products later, the world’s favourite furnishing giant gets that one mega marketing tool that it fearlessly spends 70% of its’ annual marketing budget on. In 2013, the number of IKEA catalogues printed(208 million copies) outnumbered that of the Holy Bible. 

IKEA visits around 1,000 customers at home every year to find out how people really live at home – how much space do they have, what styles do they prefer? In order to show solutions in a way people can relate to, the catalogue is divided by activities you can do with the IKEA range – tips and ideas on how to solve specific needs and dreams. It’s about the way people live and how IKEA products can improve their lives.

The catalogue evolves each year with images getting more spectacular, technology being integrated and ideas going beyond regular furnishing solutions. For 2014 it launches the theme of living with children, based on the knowledge that all moments count for families with children. It offers safe, affordable, sustainable solutions – helping families make the most of time spent together. And it continues to innovate, with around 50 pages that can be scanned to access extra content.

But the big news for this year is the augmented reality, which enables readers to see how around 100 products will look in their home – in 3D!

Almost 211 million catalogues have been printed in 66 editions and 30 languages. 

You can view the online version of the catalogue here.

When a company invests so consistently in a property, it’s advertising intensity isn’t compromised on either. Below is a series of outdoor hoardings that IKEA put up across various cities. Each of these hoardings have carefully been crafted to reach the very wide range of target audience that the company has. The hoardings with the tagline, ‘There’s a page for that in the IKEA Catalogue’ focuses on different life situations that cover almost every age group, focusing on the fact that IKEA has an answer to everything.

The hoardings also show two coloured bookmarks that are simultaneously associated with one of the two statements. The first statement, a regular scenario, is bookmarked in Blue and the second one, the surprise, is bookmarked in yellow, suggesting that the Catalogue can handle any situation. The design is copy focused, clean and eye-catching. Perfect for the everyday passer-by.

The hoardings highlight the wholesomeness of the catalogue, along with the numerous products that it contains. It’s also a two-birds-with-one-stone kind of strategy where the series gives a message that an IKEA Catalogue is ALWAYS relevant.

ALWAYS.

Mission accomplished.

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That’s that from IKEA. Do drop your comments below. Or go ahead, and read more posts. There’s no such thing as too many awesome ads watched in one day. No such thing.

 

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The Nike commercial that went all Pixar

#AnAdvertADay #Day38

In a completely new approach to Nike’s advertising methods, they took a fresh route via the use of animation for their new World Cup 2014 commercial, ‘The Last game’. This commercial is a part of their ‘Risk Everything’ campaign.

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The concept  is that mad scientists have created clone versions of Cristiano Ronaldo, Neymar Jr., Wayne Rooney, Zlatan Ibrahimović, Andrés Iniesta, Franck Ribery, David Luiz and Tim Howard. The human versions, you see, take too many risks on the field, and their percentage chances for success aren’t great. The clones, meanwhile, precise and machinelike in their decision making, have been engineered to take no risks and are ready to stomp on their frail human opponents with ruthless mathematical efficiency.

This commercial is a gorgeously rendered, Pixar style animated film that takes users through a legendary journey of good v/s evil but with a fresher perspective. Nike has also added an element of self-deprecation that makes it a lighter watch. The commercial’s lack of lustrous football stars is more than made up for by their animated versions.

Spoiler alert – The clones lose.

Watch the video here –